Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

home

Working Paper 7: A Comparative Analysis: The Sustainable Development Impact of Two Wind Farms in Ethiopia

This working paper by Yanning Chen evaluates the sustainable development impact of HydroChina’s involvement in the Adama Wind Farm project in Ethiopia and compares it with Vergnet, a French firm involved in the construction and financing of the similar Ashegoda Wind Farm. Through interviews with key stakeholders and detailed analysis of the negotiation and construction processes in both projects, the research concludes that the Chinese-financed and constructed Adama Wind Farm provided similar sustainable development benefits as the French-financed and constructed Ashegoda Wind Farm. Chen concludes that donor country characteristics may not be the main determinants of sustainable development impact. In Ethiopia's case, the host country played a crucial role. Download Working Paper (PDF) »


Working Paper 6: Capturing the Rains: A Comparative Study of Chinese Involvement in Cameroon's Hydropower Sector

This paper by Yunnan Chen and David G. Landry looks at two hydropower projects in Cameroon—one financed by China Eximbank, and one financed by a multilateral consortium led by the World Bank—to assess decisions around project financing, contracting, and implementation processes. It offers insight into Chinese practices around infrastructure project financing and assessment standards, as well as World Bank practices as a re-emerging donor in the field of hydropower. Download Working Paper (PDF) »

Policy Brief 16: Local Politics Meets Chinese Engineers: A Study of the Chinese-Built Standard Gauge Railway Project in Kenya

This policy brief by Uwe Wissenbach and Yuan Wang examines how local Kenyan politics have affected the construction of the first phase of the SGR, which runs from Mombasa to Nairobi. Research was conducted through in-depth interviews with over 20 stakeholders, extensive review of publicly available documents and media coverage, and three field visits to project sites in November 2014, August 2015, and December 2015. Download Policy Brief (PDF) »


Policy Brief 15: Provincial Chinese Actors in Africa: The Case of Sichuan in Uganda

This policy brief by Xuefei Shi looks at how provincial governments (or municipalities) aid outside actors. This system is generally referred to as duikou zhiyuan (对口支 援, “twinning assistance”). Since 2006, the Chinese have funded 25 agro-technology demonstrations centers (ATDCs) in Africa. As a result, most of the 25 centers in Africa have contracts with teams from Chinese provinces. For example, Chongqing sent a team to Tanzania; a team from Hubei is in Mozambique; and Sichuan is in Uganda. Download Policy Brief (PDF) »

Policy Brief 14: Do Huawei's Training Programs Transfer Skills to Africa?

This policy brief by Benjamin Tsui examines Huawei's engagement in developing local talent in information communications and technologies (ICT) in Africa, specifically in Egypt, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Research was conducted using news reports, press releases, corporate reports, and academic studies. Download Policy Brief (PDF) »

Afrobarometer: China wins favorable reviews in new Africa survey

Monday, October 31, 2016

How do Africans view China’s economic presence on the continent? The latest Afrobarometer survey reports that on average, 63% of Africans surveyed believed China to be a “somewhat” or very positive influence in their countries while only 15% see it as somewhat/very negative.” As Afrobarometer summarized:  

Findings from Afrobarometer’s 2014/2015 surveys in 36 African countries, which included a special series of questions on China, suggest that the public holds generally favourable views of economic and assistance activities by China. Africans rank the United States and China No. 1 and 2, respectively, as development models for their own countries. Remarkably, in three of five African regions, China either matches or surpasses the United States in popularity as a development model. In terms of their current influence, the two countries are outpaced only by Africa’s former colonial powers. 

Read the complete Blog post »


Twitter.png